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COVID-19 Vaccine

A vaccine is finally available. Everyone will get their chance to get vaccinated. We encourage you to sign up when eligible. Together we can stop the spread.

Only those groups eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine at this time should complete the form. Learn more about future eligible groups from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services website here.


Start here

If you are unable to complete the form, call us at 877-998-0880.


Because COVID-19 vaccine supply is minimal, a limited number of appointments are available every week. As additional vaccine becomes available, we are calling individuals to schedule an appointment. No walk-ins are available. Individuals must have an appointment to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Learn more about vaccine availability >


Vaccine stories

Thousands of individuals have already received the COVID-19 vaccine. Read some of their stories below.

Pittsville Fire Chief Jerry Minor receiving the COVID vaccine Why I got the COVID-19 vaccine: A firefighter’s perspective

Pittsville Fire Chief Jerry Minor did not hesitate to get immunized when the COVID-19 vaccine became available.

Read more >





MCHS provider getting the COVID-19 vaccine “It was a Miracle.” 65 and older now receiving COVID-19 vaccines

Folks 65 and older are eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine in Wisconsin.

Hear from one couple >




MCHS provider getting the COVID-19 vaccine

Jacob Luttropp is a nurse that has been in the COVID-19 unit at our Marshfield Medical Center-Eau Claire. He recently got the COVID-19 vaccine.

Read his why >




Eligible groups

Only the below groups are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine at this time.

Frontline health care personnel

  • Anesthesia related team members
  • Behavior health providers, including psychologists, therapists, counselors
  • Certified nursing assistant, nursing assistant, nurse aide, medical assistant
  • Chiropractors
  • Clinical ethicist
  • Dental services, including dentist, dental hygienist, dental assistants
  • Direct care personnel, for example, people who provide direct care to patients, including in their homes (for example, personal care assistant; home health worker; adult day service providers; paid and unpaid caregivers in Family Care, Family Care Partnership, and IRIS; paid and unpaid caregivers of children in special needs programs, including Children’s Waivers, CCOP, B3, Children with Medical Complexity, CCF WAM and Katie Beckett Medicaid)
  • Emergency medical responders (EMR), including emergency medical technician/paramedic including all levels of EMRs
  • Environmental services, food & nutrition, buildings & grounds in patient care setting
  • Funeral home worker, coroners, and medical examiners
  • Health care trainees
  • Hospice workers
  • Massage therapists
  • Nurse, including community settings
  • Long-term care facility inspectors and oversight staff
  • Long-term care facility personnel (including those that work in 1-2 bed adult family homes and as supported living providers)
  • Pharmacist/pharmacist assistant
  • Phlebotomist and laboratory personnel
  • Physician assistant/nurse practitioners
  • Physicians (MD/DO – all settings)
  • Public health workers providing vaccines and testing for COVID-19
  • Radiation therapy technologists (RTTs)/radiologic technologists (RTs)
  • Respiratory therapists
  • Security personnel
  • Spiritual care provider
  • Social work, case management, Child Life staff (only those providing in-person support, including child welfare workers and adult protective services)
  • Therapy services, for example, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy
  • Transportation services to and from health care settings, for example, testing sites, dialysis centers, ambulatory care
  • Other professionals and lay people who provide services as defined in “Vaccine Distribution Subcommittee: Phase 1A Guidance for Vaccinating Entities to Prioritize COVID-19 Vaccine in Priority Population”
  • Transportation services to and from health care settings, for example, testing sites, dialysis centers, ambulatory care

Emergency responders

  • Correctional staff
  • Emergency medical responders (EMR), including emergency medical technician/paramedic including all levels of EMRs
  • Firefighters
  • Police

Residents of long-term care facilities

  • This includes individuals who live and work in nursing homes, independent living communities, residential care homes and other types of long-term care facilities.

People 65 years of age or older

  • All individuals who are 65 years of age or older qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine. Due to supply of the COVID-19 vaccine, it may take months to vaccinate this large group.

Other

  • People who have received a letter from the State of Wisconsin confirming eligibility.

Vaccine safety and effectiveness

Our nationally-recognized infectious disease providers and epidemiologists agree with other experts that the vaccine:

  • Does not cause serious side effects,
  • Has not resulted in long-term health concerns to this point and
  • Is at least 94% effective at preventing COVID-19.

Below are answers to common questions. 

Is the vaccine safe?

  • There are no reported serious safety concerns from either vaccine. All approved vaccines have gone through extensive clinical trials. The vaccine’s safety and efficacy have also been reviewed by two panels of independent experts at the FDA. While the vaccine did go through the clinical trial process quickly, it was tested on thousands of people just like every other vaccine or treatment that needs to be approved by the FDA. The shorter timeframe for vaccine development was achieved by reducing the time between each phase of the clinical trials.

Is the vaccine effective?

  • The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is 95% effective against symptomatic COVID-19. Protection is high even in older adults and people with chronic diseases. There is some evidence the vaccine also protects against severe COVID-19. Protection continues at a high level for at least 3-4 months. We do not yet know if protection will decline over time or if a booster dose will be needed.
  • The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is 94% effective against symptomatic COVID-19. Protection is high even in older adults and people with chronic diseases. There is some evidence the vaccine also protects against severe COVID-19. Protection continues at a high level for at least 3-4 months. We do not yet know if protection will decline over time or if a booster dose will be needed.

Are there any long-term health concerns of the vaccine?

  • The vaccine has been tested on tens of thousands of people in initial clinical trials. No serious safety concerns were reported in these trials. However, more monitoring is needed to better understand if there are any long term side effects beyond the timeframe of the clinical trials. Ongoing safety monitoring through existing programs will continue to address safety concerns with the vaccine in real-time. The programs include the Vaccine Safety Datalink, Clinical Safety Assessment project, Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting Systems and new monitoring systems such as the V-SAFE program and the National Healthcare Safety Network.

What are the short term side effects of the vaccine?

  • Pain at the injection site is common and many people develop symptoms such as fatigue, headache, chills and muscle aches. These are mild to moderate in most people and typically resolve after 1-2 days. Lymph nodes may also become swollen and tender on the same side as the injection. These side effects occur because the immune system is responding normally to the vaccine. In general, these side effects are more severe after the second dose, and they may be less severe in older adults

How was the vaccine developed so quickly?

  • While the vaccine was developed quickly, no corners were cut for the development of the vaccine. Fortunately, previous clinical research for SARS and MERS was able to be used as the vaccine was being developed to shorten the timeline. Clinical trials were also overlapped and the production of the vaccine happened prior to the completion of the vaccine. A pharmaceutical company would have never taken a risk like this had the federal government not provided incentives to do so. Finally, the FDA was able to give the vaccines emergency use authorization based on the importance of the vaccine before it is officially approved.

Which vaccine is the best?

  • All available vaccines currently provide a similar level of protection and safety. They also function in a similar way using mRNA. We feel there is not a better vaccine for patients.

If you have additional questions related to the COVID-19 vaccine, please refer to these frequently asked questions