Skip to navigation Skip to Content

Stroke Symptoms

​​​​​​​​​​​​A stroke is a medical emergency. 

If any of the symptoms listed below come on suddenly, call 911 or have someone drive you to the emergency room if that is quicker. Don't drive yourself.

Marshfield Clinic Stroke Specialists offer treatments that are not available anywhere else in our area.​​​​​​​​​​

During a stroke, blood stops flowing to part of the brain. This can damage areas in the brain that control the rest of the body. Get help right away if any of these symptoms come on suddenly, even if the symptoms don’t last.

Know the symptoms of a stroke
Man sitting next to lake with fishing rod, holding arm and looking distressed. Younger man sitting next to him, looking concerned.
A sudden feeling of weakness on one side of your body may be a sign that you are having a stroke.

  • Weakness. You may feel a sudden weakness, tingling, or a loss of feeling on 1 side of your face or body including your arm or leg. 

  • Vision problems. You may have sudden double vision or trouble seeing in 1 or both eyes.

  • Speech problems. You may have sudden trouble talking, slurred speech, or problems understanding others.

  • Headache. You may have a sudden, severe headache.

  • Movement problems. You may have sudden trouble walking, dizziness, a feeling of spinning, a loss of balance, a feeling of falling, or blackouts.

  • Seizure. You may also have a seizure with a large or hemorrhagic stroke. 

Remember: If you have any of these symptoms, call 911 and your doctor as soon as possible.

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the signs of a stroke. When you see these signs, you will know that you need to call 911 fast. 

F.A.S.T. stands for:

  • F is for face drooping - One side of the face is drooping or num. When the person smiles, the smile is uneven.

  • A is for arm weakness - One arm is weak or numb. When the person lifts both arms at the same time, one arm may drift downward.

  • S is for speech difficulty - You may notice slurred speech or difficulty speaking. The person can't repeat a simple sentence correctly when asked.

  • T is for time to dial 911 - If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if they go away, call 911 immediately. Make note of the time the symptoms first appeared.

Request Appointment

Contact us for care

If this is a medical emergency, call 911.

Call: 1-866-520-2510

(Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

 TIA Video

How Much Do You Know About Stroke?

Stroke is a leading cause of death and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability, according to the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Stroke Association (ASA). The ASA reports that strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. Find out more about stroke by taking this quiz, based on information from the AHA and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

1. What is another name for a stroke?
2. An ischemic stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel to the brain.
3. Which of these is a symptom of stroke?
4. Which of these lifestyle factors plays the biggest role in increasing the risk for stroke in younger adults?
5. If a person has an ischemic stroke, how quickly should the person be treated to minimize long-term problems?
6. Which type of medicine is given to help prevent a stroke?
7. Which of these may be a long-term problem after a stroke?