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Hemorrhagic stroke

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Hemorrhagic stroke​s happen when a blood vessel in the brains ruptures.

Blood leaks into surrounding brain tissue and causes pressure.

This also disrupts the supply of blood and oxygen to the brain causing damage.

Marshfield Clinic Stroke Specialists use advanced techniques to diagnose and treat strokes of all kinds.

What is Hemorrhagic Stroke?

The brain needs a constant supply of blood to work. During a stroke, blood stops flowing to part of the brain.

Front view of head and upper body showing carotid arteries and brain.
The carotids are large arteries that carry blood from the heart to the brain.

The affected area is damaged. Its functions are harmed or even lost. Most strokes are caused by a blockage in a blood vessel that supplies the brain. They can also occur if a blood vessel in the brain breaks open (ruptures).

From the heart to the brain

The heart is a pump. It sends oxygen-rich blood out through blood vessels called arteries. Carotid arteries carry blood from the heart to the brain. Blood vessels in the brain carry oxygen-rich blood to brain tissue.

How a stroke occurs

Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. This lets blood spill into or build up in nearby brain tissue. The extra blood presses on those brain cells and can damage them or even cause them to die. Other brain cells die because their normal blood supply is cut off because of high pressure in the skull.

Cross section of ruptured artery in brain causing hemorrhagic stroke.
Blood from a ruptured artery puts pressure on the brain and damages brain cells.

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If this is a medical emergency, call 911.

Call: 1-866-520-2510

(Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

 Stroke Video

Stroke Quiz

Find out how much you know about strokes and what causes them.

1. A stroke is caused by a blood clot or blood vessel that breaks. This stops the flow of blood to an area of the brain.
2. All strokes are the same.
3. One symptom of a stroke is a sudden, unexplained tingling or numbness on one side of the body.
4. If you have symptoms of a stroke, you should try to get some rest before calling the doctor.
5. There's no way of predicting if or when someone will have a stroke.
6. Two important ways to reduce your risk for stroke are to lower your blood pressure and to stop smoking.
7. Regular exercise is another way to cut your risk for stroke.
8. Strokes always leave people permanently disabled.